THE SYMMES MEMORIAL

SEVENTH GENERATION

(Click on an UPPER CASE name within these Trees to view the known details)

INDEX 1 to the SEVENTH GENERATION
via Fifth Generation [91] SAMUEL SYMMES:
[1] Zechariah
[4] William
[17] William
[54] Zechariah
[91] Samuel Symmes
[164] John
[298] JOHN[299] WILLIAM BITTLE




INDEX 2 to the SEVENTH GENERATION
via Fifth Generation [100] Captain JOHN SYMMES:
[1] Zechariah
[4] William
[17] William
[58] John
[100] Captain John Symmes
[185] Deacon John[186] Thomas[189] Marshall[193] Charles
[340] JOHN ALBERT[341] CHARLES CAREY[342] HENRY R.[343] LUTHER R.[346] THOMAS RUSSELL[355] MARSHALL[358] ALEXANDER[360] Ellen Louisa[361] CHARLES THOMAS[386] JOHN THOMAS[387] THOMAS JOHN[388] Edmund[389] Tiberius Wright
Wellington Family




INDEX 3 to the SEVENTH GENERATION
via Fifth Generation [113] TIMOTHY SYMMES:
[1] Zechariah
[4] William
[18] Timothy
[62] Timothy
[113] Timothy Symmes
[205] Celadon[207] William[208] John Cleves[212] Peyton[213] Timothy
[406] DANIEL[408] BENJAMIN[410] CELADON[412] Esther[413] JOSEPH[414] Sarah Deborah[416] Phebe[418] TIMOTHY[419] Louisiana[420] AMERICUS[421] WILLIAM[423] JOHN[443] Mary Susan[449] HENRY EDWARD[461] HENRY HARKER
Hunter familyPowers familyHoel familyTaylor and Baker familiesColburn family




INDEX 4 to the SEVENTH GENERATION
via Fifth Generation [126] CALEB SYMMES:
[1] Zechariah
[11] Zechariah
[31] Thomas
[80] Thomas
[126] Caleb Symmes
[227] Caleb[229] Thomas
[479] CALEB[480] Betsey[482] Lucy[483] WILLARD[484] CALVIN[486] Mary[487] THOMAS[488] THOMAS[491] Edea Fletcher[495] EDWARD[496] Edmund
Mixter familyClement familyPaterson familyDrew family




INDEX 5 to the SEVENTH GENERATION
via Fifth Generation [147] ISAAC SYMMES:
[1] Zechariah
[11] Zechariah
[31] Thomas
[85] Zechariah
[147] Isaac Symmes
[253] Isaac[262] Zechariah Parker
[519] WILLIAM[520] Mary Whitman[539] LEWIS[543] CHARLES
Sampson family










[298] JOHN SYMMES, eldest son of John and Abigail (Green) Symmes of South Woburn; born 14 December 1819; married first Almira Stoddard of Woburn. She died previous to 1845. He married second, 9 June 1845, Mary Kendall Carter of Albany, New York. She was born 14 June 1827, daughter of Levi and Cynthia (Kendall) Carter, residents in Albany but not natives of that place. She died at Burlington, Mass., 11 June 1860 aged 33. He married third at Lexington, Mass., 30 June 1861 Emily Carter born in North Bridgton, Me., 13 September 1832, daughter of Henry and Hannah (Cochran) Carter. She was cousin to the second wife - her father Henry being brother of Levi Carter, already mentioned. Hannah Cochran, wife of Henry Carter, was an Andover woman.

Mr. Symmes was by trade originally a carpenter and worked in the sash and blind business. He has resided in Naples (Me), Burlington (Mass), Lawrence (Mass), and now lives on Elm Street in Winchester. He goes to Boston daily, where he is superintendent of the large piano-forte manufactory of Hallett, Cumston & Co.

There were no children by the first wife, at least none that lived.

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[299] WILLIAM BITTLE SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 13 June 1822; married Anna Hill of Portsmouth, N.H., 11 February 1847.
He lives in New York city or very near there and is connected with a clothing store in that city.
Only one child: [555] William, born 31 July 1851.

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[340] JOHN ALBERT SYMMES, son of Deacon John and Pamelia (Richardson) Symmes; born at "Symmes's Corner", Medford, 3 November 1812; married Lydia Maria Smith 1 June 1839.
He kept a store in South Woburn, now the centre of Winchester. He was to have taken the wheelwright's business from his father's hands with his brother Luther and moved to the homestead for this purpose, but died from a cut on the knee 19 February 1849, aged 36 years and three months.
He had but one child: [556] Amelia Maria, born 24 March 1841.

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[341] CHARLES CAREY SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 15 November 1814; married 10 November 1840 Lydia Fletcher Clark, daughter of Deacon Oliver Clark of Tewksbury, Mass. by his first wife, and half-sister to Hon. Oliver Richardson Clark of Winchester, and Rev. Edward Warren Clark of Claremont, N.H., they being children of the second wife.

Mr. Symmes went to Aylmer, Ottawa, Canada East, when sixteen years of age as clerk to his uncle Charles Symmes [193], a lumber merchant there. After his marriage in 1840 he and his brother Henry succeeded to their uncle's business. He died of cholera at Three Rivers, Canada East, 4 August 1854. His widow Lydia died at Aylmer, C.E. 26 March 1859.

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[342] HENRY RICHARDSON SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 13 April 1818; married 25 March 1842 his cousin Abigail Symmes [376] born 8 January 1826, daughter of his father's youngest brother Charles of Aylmer, Canada East.
He resided some years at Aylmer, where he was editor of a paper. In 1858 he removed to Three Rivers in the same province and has since been superintendent of Public Works on the River Saint Maurice.

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[343] LUTHER RICHARDSON SYMMES, brother of the preceding and youngest son of Deacon John and Pamelia (Richardson) Symmes; born 21 March 1822; married 1 November 1848 Elizabeth Abby Ayer, daughter of Nathaniel Ayer formerly of Charlestown and more recently of Winchester, and sister of Thomas Prentiss Ayer.

He resides at the old homestead at Symmes's Corner, Winchester, on the spot where he was born. He was for some time a wheelwright, following the business of his father and grandfather. He is now the efficient superintendent of the upper portion of the Charlestown Water Works, which derive an unfailing supply from Mystic Pond, near to which is Symmes's Corner and Mr. Symmes's house. North of this beautiful sheet of water and immediately contiguous to it was the farm granted to his ancestor, Rev. Zechariah Symmes, two centuries and a quarter ago.
Only one child: [575] Alice Frances, born 13 September 1851.

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[346] THOMAS RUSSELL SYMMES, son of Thomas and Sarah Lloyd (Wait) Symmes; born 1812; married Harriet Eady of Canada.
He lived at Aylmer, Canada East, and died a few years ago.

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[355] MARSHALL SYMMES, eldest son of Marshall and Lephe (Stowell) Symmes; born in what is now the south part of Winchester 27 October 1818; married 17 June 1846 Abbie Stowell, born 16 August 1824, daughter of Samuel Stowell of Worcester who was cousin of Abel Stowell, already mentioned as the husband of his aunt Elizabeth Symmes.
They live at Symmes's Corner, south Winchester, in the house formerly owned and occupied by Governor John Brooks.

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[358] ALEXANDER STOWELL SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 13 December 1823; married 27 January 1852 Sarah Jane Livermore of Watertown, born 7 December 1830.
They reside in Medford.

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[361] CHARLES THOMAS SYMMES, brother of the preceding and youngest child of Marshall and Lephe (Stowell) Symmes; born 9 March 1832; married 30 March 1863 Abby Elizabeth Hunt born 28 February 1843, daughter of John Hunt of Roxbury and sister of John G. Hunt who was the husband of Abby Maria Stowell.

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[386] JOHN THOMAS SYMMES, son of Charles and Hannah (Ricker) Symmes; born at Aylmer, Canada East 26 January 1836; married Harriet Grimes 5 April 1860.

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[387] THOMAS JOHN SYMMES, twin brother of the preceding; born at Aylmer, Canada East 26 January 1836; married Mary Weymouth 17 April 1865.
[Children born to Thomas John Symmes after 1871 - a further three sons and one daughter - and known descendants are introduced in "21st Century" under "Beyond the Symmes Memorial" (see Contents window)]

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[406] DANIEL TUTHILL SYMMES, son of Celadon and Phebe (Randolph) Symmes; born in Butler County, Ohio 5 November 1798; married 8 May 1823 Lucinda Gaston daughter of Joseph and Martha (Hutton) Gaston.

He passed his life in agricultural pursuits in his native place, was a leading man in that vicinity and died somewhat prematurely on 14 August 1830 in his 32nd year.

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[408] Captain BENJAMIN RANDOLPH SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 1802; married first Eliza Gaston in 1826. She was sister of Lucinda Gaston, wife of Daniel Tuthill Symmes. He married second Jane Pauley in 1835.

He has always resided in the vicinity where he was born and has devoted himself to the pursuits of agriculture. He was for a long time captain of a company of militia and also justice of the peace. In 1840 he built a hotel on the southwestern corner of the section of land which had been the property of his father, three miles south of Hamilton, Ohio. To this locality he gave the name Symmes's Corner, whence the name of the village which has since sprung up in that vicinity. In 1844 he removed to the "Corner" and kept the hotel himself for many years. He also served as postmaster of that village from that date to 1861. He still resides at Symmes's Corner.

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[410] CELADON SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born 1807; married 1828 Catharine Blackburn.
He is a well-to-do farmer in Butler, Ohio and a member of the Presbyterian church. After his brother Daniel died he was guardian of his three fatherless, helpless children, and acted towards them the part of a father.In this family the reader will observe seven sons in succession.

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[412] ESTHER WOODRUFF SYMMES, sister of the preceding, born 1811; married in 1827 William Noble Hunter who was a farmer in Butler County, Ohio and an elder in the Presbyterian church, a very worthy man. [By 1873 they had eleven children surnamed Hunter and three Huston grandchildren].

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[413] JOSEPH RANDOLPH SYMMES, brother of the preceding, born 1814; married first Martha J Huston in 1840; married second Mary C. Bigham in 1847.
He is a farmer near Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio; a man of strict integrity and unusual strength of character. He is now, in December 1872, an elder in the First Presbyterian Church in Hamilton, Ohio.

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[418] TIMOTHY SYMMES, son of William and Rebecca (Randolph) Symmes; born in Butler County, Ohio 1809; married in 1830 Harriet Wilmuth.
He was a farmer in Butler County and died in 1838.

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[420] AMERICUS SYMMES, eldest son of Captain John Cleves Symmes; born at Bellefontaine 2 November 1811; married first in 1832 Anna Milliken of Hamilton, Ohio, daughter of Dr. Daniel Milliken. She died there on 5 January 1839. He married second in 1840 at Louisville, Kentucky, Frances Scott daughter of Major Chasteen Scott of Boone County, Kentucky.
His father died when he was but little more than seventeen years of age, leaving in his hands an estate encumbered with debt and a widowed mother and three children besides himself to provide for. The responsible task was well performed.
He resided at Hamilton, Ohio till 1850, then removed to Covington, Kentucky. In 1852 he removed to a fine farm three miles southeast of Louisville, Kentucky.

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[421] Dr. WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON SYMMES, brother of the preceding and son of Captain John Cleves Symmes; born at Bellefontaine May 1813; married first Phebe A. Wayne at Greyville, Illinois 1840. She died there 1851. He married second Mrs. H. Bargen, 1853, at Shawneetown, Illinois, a niece of the noted Benjamin Hardy of Kentucky.
He studied medicine in Frankfort, Kentucky; graduated at the Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio in 1837. He practised medicine some years in Ohio; in 1857 removed to Mattoon, Illinois, and is now a physician in Kansas City, Missouri.

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[423] Captain JOHN CLEVES SYMMES, brother of the preceding and youngest son of Captain John Cleves Symmes; born at Newport, Kentucky 25 October 1824; married in 1862 at Berlin, Prussia while sojourning in Germany, Marie Lepowitz of Posen, in Prussian Poland.

He graduated at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point in 1847 at the head of his class and with a higher "general merit" in studies than any other student of that institution had ever exhibited.
He was second lieutenant of Artillery immediately on his graduation 1 July 1847, and two months afterwards - August 30 - became Acting Assistant Professor of Ethics etc in that institution.
He was transferred to the Ordnance Department 24 August 1849, and was, unsolicited, made a captain of infantry by the Secretary of War on the formation of new regiments in 1855, but declined the appointment, preferring the artillery service.

After this he was stationed at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas and was promoted to be captain of Ordnance, but was compelled to retire from active service on account of sickness and weak eyes, contracted at that station. He made, from time to time, fifteen breech loading guns and a cannon, all different. He has invented a new species of arms, which he proposes to call the "Simz Rifle" and the "Simz Cannon"; also an air engine which he calls "The Simz Power".

He is now on the invalid list, and since September 1862 has resided in Berlin, Prussia, where he had a son:
[781] John Haven Cleves, born 1866.

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[449] Major HENRY EDWARD SYMMES, son of Peyton S. Symmes of Cincinnati; born in Cincinnati 1835; never married.

When the war of the rebellion broke out in April 1861 he entered with ardor and energy into the great struggle against the enemies of the Union. In a very few days he left his native city at the head of a company of nearly one hundred men. This was afterwards known as Company C in the 5th Regiment Ohio Volunteers. This regiment was chiefly made up of Cincinnati young men, the flower of that city.
At the end of the three months term for which it originally enlisted, it was mustered for three years. Its first campaign was in West Virginia. They were first under fire in the affair of Blue's Gap near Romney, so called because it is a narrow ravine between two high hills, the ravine in one place only twenty feet wide. It was on the 8th January 1862 and the snow was six inches deep. In this affair Captain Symmes led the advanced guard of one hundred and fifty men in most gallant style and was in the thickest of the fight, till the enemy, though strongly posted, made a hasty retreat.

The regiment bore a conspicuous part in the battle of Winchester on 23 March 1862; joined General McDowell at Fredericksburg May 1862; were actively engaged in the battles of Port Republic on 9 June, Cedar Mountain 9 August, in the second battle of Bull Run on 29 August, in the battle of Antietam on 17 September, in the defence of Dumfries against the attack of the rebel Stuart on 27 December - all in 1862 - then in the battle of Chancellorsville 1-3 May, of Gettysburg 2-4 July, and of Lookout Mountain 23-25 November 1863.
In these severe engagements the regiment lost the greater part of its men.

In January 1864 Captain Symmes was promoted to be major. Colonel John H. Patrick, who commanded the regiment, was killed by a concealed rebel and Major Symmes succeeded to the command but received a mortal wound from a rebel in a rifle-pit, of which he died at Chattanooga in May or June 1864, being only 29 years of age.

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[461] Captain HENRY HARKER SYMMES, only son of Timothy and Ruth Symmes; born 1821; married Belinda Sedam in 1846.
His home is St. Louis, Mo., but he passed the greater part of his life on the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri rivers as pilot, mate and captain of steamboats. Thirteen steamers are recollected of which he has been captain and owner-in-trust. He is noted for great bodily strength. Frequently, when two men have been fighting, he has gone up to them and, taking one in each hand, has held them apart until their rage subsided.

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[479] CALEB SYMMES, eldest son of Caleb and Lydia (Trowbridge) Symmes; born in Westford, Mass., 1 September 1786; married in Charlestown 27 January 1814 - by Rev. Jedidiah Morse D.D. - Mary Bowers born in Littleton, Mass, 26 December 1793, daughter of Samuel and Lucy (Allen) Bowers.

He had no trade. For some years was employed in farm work. He came to Charlestown at twenty years of age. The embargo and war followed, the times were hard and money difficult to obtain. He was happy, therefore, to get anything to do. At length he became funeral undertaker and did the most of that sort of business in Charlestown for several years. He was a man of good common sense and sound judgment. His company was sought by the young for the information he could impart of "the olden time". He gave his children a good school education, fitting them for usefulness in future life. He enjoyed a competency through life and left a competency to his family.

He died in Charlestown 8 December 1856 and was interred in the old cemetery there. His wife, who has long been a member of the First Congregational Church there, still survives in February 1873. All the above children of mature age, except Martha Eliza, were married by Rev. William Ives Budington, then pastor of the First Church in Charlestown, Mass., now in Brooklyn, New York.

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[483] WILLARD HALL SYMMES, brother of the preceding, named for his ancestor Rev. Willard Hall of Westford; born in Groton, Mass. 26 March 1796; married 5 February 1819 Sally Parker born in Littleton, Mass. 2 November 1802, daughter of Ebenezer and Sally (Bowers) Parker.
They lived in Charlestown and their children were born there. He left Charlestown for New York on business 25 December 1824 and it is supposed died soon after.

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[484] CALVIN SYMMES, brother of the preceding; born in Groton, Mass. 8 March 1798; never married.
It may be said of him that he was a born mechanic. When he was a little boy he was always using a jack-knife, and wherever there was a little water-fall he would place a water-wheel made by himself. When eighteen years of age his adventurous spirit moved him to go to sea. He was absent five years and made two voyages, visiting Antwerp, the Hawaiian and Marquesas Islands, Sumatra and China. At one island the ship was in want of charcoal, and he made some, to the great delight of the natives.
After his return he was employed as a machinist at Great Falls, Somersworth, and Dover, N.H., and at Manayunk, seven miles from Philadelphia; but when or where he learned the business his friends never knew.

After this he hired a small factory in Troy, New York, employing sixteen or twenty people in spinning cotton warp. He resided in Troy about two years, his sisters Lydia and Harriet being with him.

In politics he was a decided Whig and a great admirer of Henry Clay. He died suddenly in Troy on 4 November 1848, aged 50, greatly lamented by his friends, and his remains were deposited in the family tomb in Charlestown.

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[487] THOMAS SYMMES, half-brother of the preceding and son of Caleb and Mary (Chittenden) Symmes; born in Charlestown 13 December 1823; married first in Charlestown - by Rev. Benjamin Tappan on 23 September 1849 - Mary Mitchell, born in Charlestown 17 October 1822, daughter of John and Sarah (Phipps) Mitchell. She died 12 April 1850. He married second - at Milford, Mass. on 25 June 1854 - Sarah Ellen Bowers, born in Littleton, Mass., 18 May 1827, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Downing) Bowers and half-sister of his brother Caleb Symmes's wife.

In his fifteenth year he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served in the Sloop-of-War Cyane under Captain Percival. He left the service when twenty-one and went to California upon the acquisition of that country by the United States. He was not successful there, returned to his native place and some time after became an officer in the State Prison at Charlestown.

He was Acting Master of the U.S. ship Pocahontas from September 1861 till September 1862 in the South Atlantic Squadron under Commodore Dupont. He was at the capture of Port Royal, S.C., 7 November 1861. From October 1862 to August 1863 the ship belonged to the West Gulf Squadron under Admiral Farragut; from November 1863 till the close of the war, to the North Atlantic Squadron under Admirals Phillips and Porter. During a part of this time he served on board the U.S. ship Agawam. He was highly approved as an officer and might have remained in the navy, but the charms of domestic life prevailed and on 4 March 1865 he obtained his discharge.
He now resides with his family in Waltham, Mass., and is connected with the well-known Waltham Watch Manufactory.

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[488] THOMAS SYMMES, eldest son of Thomas and Rebecca (Carver) Symmes; born in Westford, Mass., 27 March 1790; never married.

He was for a short rime a lieutenant on board of a privateer in the war of 1812. He was taken prisoner, carried to Halifax and confined to prison on Melville Island where he remained till the war was over, his health good though otherwise suffering greatly.

Writing from Philadelphia on 29 April 1815 he says: "I arrived in the brig Herald, eight days from Halifax". From Philadelphia he proceeded to Charlestown, South Carolina, and engaged as a clark in a dry-goods store. Subsequently he engaged in that business for himself, acquired competency, and returned to Massachusetts in 1839.

After the death of his father in 1817 he supplied the place of a father to the other children. His purse was always open to the needs of the family. He lost his life in the fearful storm of 27 November 1846 by the stranding of the Steamer Atlantic on Fisher's Island, at the entrance of Long Island Sound. Many others perished at the same time. He was on his way to Washington to spend the winter. Three weeks afterwards, his body was recovered and brought to Westford for interment.

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[495] EDWARD SYMMES, brother of the preceding and son of Thomas and Rebecca (Carver) Symmes; born in Westford, Mass., 1 April 1806; married 19 November 1840 Rebecca Pierce Fletcher, born 30 March 1814, daughter of Captain Aaron and Sally (Keep) Fletcher of Carlisle, Mass.

In 1826 he was employed in the machine-shop of the Hamilton Manufacturing Company, Lowell. In 1827 he was in the service of the Merrimack Manufacturing Company in the same city. He passed a little more than a year in a manufacturing establishment in Saco, Me., 1828 and 1829. Returning to his mother's house in Westford in 1829 he studied surveying; taught school the following winter and again in the winter of 1830-31. He was assistant in the retail store in Westford in the summer of 1831; and in trade on his own account there from 1 May 1832 till 17 September 1838. At the last date he removed to Lunenburg in Worcester County and engaged in trade there till the spring of 1840, when he returned to Westford and resumed store-keeping in that place. In the spring of 1843 he removed to the old homestead of his grandmother, widow of Caleb Symmes, which he had purchased in 1832, where he has since pursued the business of farming, occasionally serving as a surveyor of land.

He has a special taste for genealogy and has rendered important aid to the compiler of this volume.

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[519] Captain WILLIAM SYMMES, son of Isaac and Mary (Whitman) Symmes; born 19 August 1802; married first, 4 March 1832, Mary D. Washburn who was born 17 August 1805 and died 7 February 1837; married second on 27 November 1841 Caroline H. Jameson, born 16 July 1816.
He lives at Kingston, Mass., is a ship-master and is said to be a skilful navigator.

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[539] LEWIS SYMMES, son of Zechariah Parker Symmes; born 17 April 1819; married 24 November 1842 Sarah P. Hood daughter of Samuel and Abigail Hood. Samuel Hood, a mariner, died at the age of 74. His wife Abigail died aged 76. The dates were not given to me, nor was the place of their residence stated.
Lewis Symmes is a shoemaker, perhaps in Beverley.

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[543] CHARLES SYMMES, brother of the preceding, son of Zechariah Parker Symmes; born 10 April 1827; married 11 April 1850 Nancy Duffee daughter of James Duffee, blacksmith, from Nova Scotia.
His place of residence in unknown to the compiler, perhaps Beverly.

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